Thursday, November 10, 2011

G. K. CHESTERTON

By Jill Carattini

In his disarming manner, such that even his opponents regarded him with affection, Chesterton exposed the inconsistencies of the modern mindset, the unfounded and unnoticed dogmatism of the unbeliever, and the misguided guidance of the cults of comfort and progress. He marveled that religious liberty now meant that we were no longer allowed to mention the subject, and that "there are those who hate Christianity and call their hatred an all-embracing love for all religions." To the convicted agnostic he said, "We don't know enough about the unknown to know that it is unknowable." To the social Darwinist he said, "It is absurd for the Evolutionist to complain that it is unthinkable for an admittedly unthinkable God to make everything out of nothing, and then pretend that it is more thinkable that nothing should turn itself into everything."



And to all who would listen, Chesterton devotedly pled the case for Christ: "The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried."



To everyone his life affected, and continues to affect, G.K. Chesterton, with and without words, made a boisterous point about delighting in life to the fullest; life that is fullest, first and foremost, because there is someone to thank. He writes:



You say grace before meals.
All right.
But I say grace before the play and the opera,
And grace before the concert and the pantomime,
And grace before I open a book,
And grace before sketching, painting,
swimming, fencing, boxing, walking, playing, dancing;
And grace before I dip the pen in the ink.



Chesterton was a man alive with the gusto of resurrection, the marvel of truth, and the thankful foresight of the coming King among us.



Jill Carattini is managing editor of A Slice of Infinity at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries in Atlanta, Georgia.

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